Blues Night
Playing records at Different Speeds
Home
What we're playing
Record Shelf
Live
Contact/Competition
Links
Publog
FREE BLUES NIGHT CDs
FREE BLUES NIGHT CDs

 

 

For your COMPLETELY FREE BLUES NIGHT CD, just send your name and address along with the title(s) you're interested in to bluesnight.org@hotmail.com. Don't worry, you can trust us. Mostly.

PLEASE NOTE: With literally A FEW copies being sent out every day, it’s obviously not possible to check them all, all the way through. Please let BLUES NIGHT know if there’s a problem with yours and whether it’s worth him getting off his arse to send you another one.

1. ANNIE LEE AND OSCAR CRAWFORD - YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT THE LORD HAS DONE FOR ME

This is from a truly magnificent record called Sorrow Come Pass Me Around, released on Advent in 1975. BLUES NIGHT scoured eBay for the LP every day for over a year. Eventually a copy turned up, as part of a large batch of sub-bargain-basement landfill which the seller wasn’t prepared to break up or send outside of the USA. So BLUES NIGHT arranged for the huge parcel to be sent from Miami to Los Angeles, which is a couple of thousand miles in the wrong direction, where his friends received it, took out the one disc of interest and sent it off to Blighty, then disposed of the rest, presumably cursing BLUES NIGHT as they did so. This was an expensive (financially and ecologically speaking) way of obtaining the record, but it didn’t disappoint. It’s tremendous.
Nevertheless, it was still a little frustrating when a copy turned up on its own from a seller who would post worldwide about a month later. BLUES NIGHT, unwilling to face a future when he wouldn’t know which of his two sons should inherit this precious slab of vinyl, bid on this one too. It didn’t come – the ONLY item in a decade of heavy eBay buying never to arrive. BLUES NIGHT remains convinced that somebody contacted the seller and persuaded them to give up the record for a couple of hundred dollars (the price that one finally turned up on GEMM for) or something. He sincerely hopes so, as it’s soon to be reissued on Parlortone.
 
2. LORD KITCHENER - DOCTOR KITCH
 
One of BLUES NIGHT’s favourite calypso records, he first heard this when it was on the jukebox in Bradley’s, which is a fantastic way to hear any record, but particularly a record that is a genuine masterpiece of schoolboy ribaldry. There are usually sevens of it floating around on eBay for reasonable prices.
 
3. J.B. LENOIR - I SING UM THE WAY I FEEL
 
Remarkable singer and songwriter. A knowledge of French pronunciation is unhelpful here, as his surname should be pronounced like the fabric conditioner. This is from an ace comp on island called This Is Blues. Don’t pay over the odds for it like BLUES NIGHT did – in Ray’s, for God’s sake - there’s millions of them out there.

4. THE KLEZMORIM - YOSHKE, YOSHKE

Yoshke, Yoshke, pace the horse,
Let him run quickly.
If he stops,
We won't be able to sell him.

The Rebbe has told us to be merry
And to drink whiskey, not wine.
 
Right you are, lads. This is from East Side Wedding  on Arhoolie. And it’s not even the best track.
 
5. JACK ROSE - ST. LOUIS BLUES
 
BLUES NIGHT felt the urge to go see some live music at the end of last year. He remembered seeing Jack Rose supporting A Hawk and a Hacksaw at Bush Hall a few years earlier and thought he’d look him up. Jack Rose, it turned out, was dead. This made BLUES NIGHT very sad, so he bought this album which made him very happy.  It includes this, BLUES NIGHT’s favourite version of the ubiquitous Blues Standard. Some time around 1910, W.C. Handy famously saw an itinerant musician playing slide by the railroad track in Mississippi and thought “now there’s a musical form that needs debasing. Wonder where that would take us?”
 
6. SOUL VENDORS AND THE GAYLADS - SOUND OF SILENCE
 
The first of a few vintage reggae cover versions of over-familiar songs. Great for breaking the tension created by too many boring old blues records.
 
7. JO ANN KELLY - I WANT YOU TO KNOW 
 
Bo Carter’s song + John Fahey’s guitar + Jo Ann Kelly’s voice = Winner. This is from her record on Nick Perls’ Blue Goose, which is the best contemporary blues label going. Except it stopped nearly forty years ago, but you know what we mean.
 
8. BERT JANSCH - CASBAH
 
Bert enters, stage left. He appears to be pretending to be Davy Graham, which is excusable because a) he’s Scottish and b) he’s good at playing the guitar. He hangs around for a while centre stage, playing something which is about as authentically North African as he is. Then Bert exits, stage right.
 
9. SIMARYP - THESE BOOTS WERE MADE FOR WALKING
 
The second (and last) of a few (?) vintage reggae cover versions of over-familiar songs. The second-best skinhead-related performance after BLUES NIGHT’s big brother’s friend’s loud enquiry of a group of skins sat on a fence in Chadacre in 1981; “Oi, skinheads / Over there / What’s it like / To have no hair?” He may still be running now. There’s a bonus point for anyone who sees the link between this track and the last.
 
10. SAM CHATMON - I STAND AND WONDER
 
Sam was Bo Carter’s brother. This is from the Arhoolie album “I Had To Paint My Face” which is fabulous. BLUES NIGHT’s copy smells like Dot Cotton’s alveoli.
 
11. PENTANGLE - I GOT A FEELING (LIVE)
 
BLUES NIGHT is worrying his hearing ain’t so good. Sometimes he can’t tell the difference between an mp3 and vinyl, but here he can. Just a bit. But that’s not why this performance is included. It’s included because one of BLUES NIGHT’s favourite tweeters is NickMotown, who recently asserted, 'A lot of people think "fuck off" is the most offensive two-word phrase in English, but it isn't - it's "bass solo."' BLUES NIGHT thinks that anyone who doesn't enjoy a Danny Thompson solo should have their ears filled in.
 
12. SEPTETO MATAMOROS - OYE MI CORO
 
The Secret Museum of Mankind is a three-double-LP series of the most incredible old 78s from all over the world. Every track on it – literally every track – is bloody amazing. This Cuban one’s a little more accessible than most – some of them take pretty serious concentration to get into.
 
13. JOHN AND BEVERLEY MARTYN - AUNTIE AVIATOR
 
John is probably BLUES NIGHT’s least favourite folkie guitar hero, but he really likes this one what he done with his wife. Dunno if the other stuff’s any good or not. Haven’t bothered listening to it.
 
14. ELIZABETH COTTEN - OH BABE IT AIN'T NO LIE
 
BLUES NIGHT’s copy of this album has her name spelt as “Cotton” on the cover! Ha! Ha ha! Hahahahaha... zzzzzzzzz.
 
15. INTRIYA AG BABO - TALIAT
 
Beautiful song from a man who is good at breaking up fights, according to the booklet accompanying this record.
 
16. NEVILLE GRANT - SICK AND TIRED
 
One of BLUES NIGHT’s favourite regulars at BLUES NIGHT’s regular BLUES NIGHTS says that this is the first record he ever bought. BLUES NIGHT chooses to believe him, because he is pretty cool. BLUES NIGHT himself heard Return of Django a hundred times before ever hearing this, which is a much better way of doing it. Probably.
 
17. PETER REITMEIER- LANDLER VON JOSEF SPAN
 
Chris Strachwitz is right near the top of BLUES NIGHT’s list of Living Blues Legends. Born a German count, growing up in Nazi Germany, then running, in Arhoolie Records, one of the most consistently excellent record labels in history (and that’s coming from a paragraph after one about a Trojan classic), recording not just blues, country, tex-mex, zydeco, klezmer, and jazz across the USA, but even returning to his homeland to record some Austrian music with the blues running right through it. There are four tracks recorded by “Mr Chris” on MORE SONGS FROM THE MAN ROOM, and several more artists with whom he was involved. What a guy. So the least we can do is say go here and buy some things.
 
18. BAYLESS ROSE - BLACK DOG
 
Was he black? Was he white? Was he a Melungeon? What is  a Melungeon? Read some blues bores here.
 
19. PERRY LEDERMAN - EVENTUALLY
 
‘Marc Silber was working in his Greenwich Village guitar shop one day in 1963 or ’64 when he overheard a conversation between Bob Dylan and Perry Lederman: “Look, I’m going to make another record,” Marc remembers Dylan saying. “Maybe you should be in a duet with me. You play the fancy stuff and I’ll just sing.” And Perry said, “Oh no, I don’t think so, man. I’m gonna go somewhere in music. I don’t have time for that.’ (From the liner notes to the immense Hear Me Howling!)
Interestingly, in the notes to his other, even better, boxset, Chris Strachwitz says that he never liked Dylan much. Hilarious.
 
20. THE ROLLING STONES - YOU CAN'T ALWAYS GET WHAT YOU WANT
 
BLUES NIGHT made this cd the day before visiting an old friend he hadn’t seen in ages, whose enthusiasm for the Rolling Stones is limited enough for him to have a favourite Stones song, which is this one. So BLUES NIGHT put it on the cd. Have you ever heard this version, without the choir at the beginning? You probably have. It’s from the single.
 
21. THE PINDAR FAMILY - I BID YOU GOODNIGHT
 
This version is from the Nonesuch LP The Real Bahamas in Music and Song. Jody Stecher, who recorded it, calls it “One of the most beautiful songs in the English language – if not in the world.” I’d never heard of him either.
 
 

 

 

1. The Rolling Stones – Sympathy for the Devil (Take 2)

I wonder how far they got with Take 1. I particularly like the way Jagger blames Charlie for this one falling apart when he’s already got the first line wrong. The Alternate Beggar’s Banquet is much better than The Alternate Let it Bleed, but definitely not worth 40 bloody quid. Unless you want to buy it off me, in which case it’s worth more.

 

2. Slim Harpo – Shake Your Hips

Credit where credit’s due, the Stones didn’t try to take the royalties for this one, crediting “James Moore” on the Exile on Main St labels. Very fucking big of them. More than they did for Robert Wilkins.

3. Lord Fly -  When Mi Look Upon Janie So; Time So Hard

Keith still has a house in Jamaica, and is very fond of the traditional Jamaican music. This mento number sounds a bit like Trinidadian Calypso, but is in fact one of the very first Jamaican-made records. So there.

 4. Howlin’ Wolf – Little Red Rooster

There’s something a little funny in the press of this record. Sorry about that. Still think it’s absolutely incredible that the Stones hit Number 1 with a slow blues record which, by the standards of the time, goes on forever.

5. Robert Wilkins – The Prodigal Son

This song really does go on forever, which is good if you are enjoying it, or actually interested in the parable of the prodigal son, or you’re DJing and need a piss. BLUES NIGHT then returns from the toilet to see his adoring crowd looking pretty bored. And that’s only halfway through. But this song would not be worthy of a place on this CD in any lesser version. It is itself a reworking of Wilkins’ 1929 recording “That’s No Way To Get Along” - since Wilkins (whose real name is Tim) had already stolen the song from himself, it probably seemed quite acceptable to state simply “by Mick Jagger and Keith Richard” in poncey script on the back of Beggars Banquet. So faithful is the Stones’ short version of this that BLUES NIGHT decided to DJ for the subconscious with the sequencing here…

6. The Rolling Stones – Stray Cat Blues (New York, 1969)

BLUES NIGHT loves Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! And this is his favourite track. And he really doesn’t have to justify putting a Stones track on a Stones-themed cd. After the sequencing success between these last two tracks, and another can of Stella, BN decided to go for the double hit, half-expecting to hear Keith play the intro to…

7. Robert Johnson – Love In Vain

You have got to love the way that this total and utter fuckup played guitar.

(Stevie Wonder - You Can't Judge a Book by its Cover has been removed from here. If you received an original version of TOPICAL DISEASE, all your subsequent track numbers are now wrong. Soz.

Stevie opened for the Stones when they were touring Exile in the States, until he had to drop out with his drummer suffering what Robert Greenfield describes as “a genuine nervous breakdown.” Presumably that means it wasn’t just a hangover. This song from 1970 was a regular in the set at the time. Probably. )

8. The Rolling Stones – Dear Doctor (Take 1)

Not too drastically different, but worth hearing.

Pros: Keith’s OTT bass line

Cons: No silly voice from Jagger.

9. Chuck Berry – Come On

Chuck Berry. What an incredible guitar sound. What a remarkable lyricist. What a complete arsehole.

10. The Flying Burrito Brothers – Wild Horses

It’s not a cover, you know. This version was actually recorded before the one on Sticky Fingers, which the Stones had spent ages farting around with. BLUES NIGHT considered putting SuBo’s version on instead, but remains convinced that he made the right decision in the end.

11. Lord Composer – Hilly and Gully Ride; Mandeville Road

This is even older than the previous Jamaican track, although it is not a Jamaican-made record as such. It’s a proper old folk song. Keith definitely likes it.

12. Muddy Waters – Let’s Spend The Night Together

Proper old blues gits hate Electric Mud. Colin Larkin said that this track represents “the ultimate artistic volte-face.” Bollocks. BLUES NIGHT loves it, and so did the DJ out of Cypress Hill, whose name escapes me. Thank you to BNBM for pointing out that the backing band (Rotary Connection) are pretending to be Cream.

13. The Staples Singers – This May Be The Last Time

What’s that boys? I can let you out of the kitchen now? Have you finished writing a song? Great! Did you write it all yourselves?

14. Otis Redding – Satisfaction

This is better than the original. BLUES NIGHT will fight anyone who disagrees.

15. The Rolling Stones – Loving Cup

This was the starting point for the CD, hence the Exile-themed title. But the Stones had been trying to record it for years – this session comes from 1969. A better title for this cd might have been “A Fool and His Money Are Easily Parted” as the nice man in JB’s records played BLUES NIGHT like a cheap guitar with this one.

BN: Wow! The Alternate Let it Bleed! Shit. Forty quid!? Is it any good?

JB: I’m a big Stones fan, and I really like it. I’ll play a bit to you.

(The piano is clearly leading us into a really cool version of Loving Cup. BLUES NIGHT, slightly pissed as he always is when thinking he can afford to go into a record shop, is desperately trying to hang on to his money.)

BN: Do you have a copy?

JB: I don’t collect records anymore. It doesn’t make good business sense.

BN: Like a drug dealer, I s’pose? Don’t get high on your own supply?

JB: Ha! Yeah. D’you want to hear another track?

BN: I’ve heard enough thank you. And I’ll have that Alternate Beggar’s Banquet too, please.

(He hands JB eighty bloody quid and exits.)

16. Terry Reid – July

Terry opened for the Stones when they were touring the States with Let It Bleed. I hope he played this one in his set, because all his other songs are shit.

17. Ike and Tina Turner – I Can’t Believe What You Say

Another refreshing soul departure made relevant by the fact that they were drafted in for the same purpose on the 1969 US Tour. Which makes their inclusion here a hell of a lot more appropriate than in a cycling-themed set at a cycling-themed café.

18. The Rolling Stones – You Got The Silver

The final scene in the play “Drunk Twat in JBs Records” is the one where BLUES NIGHT finds that this is the only other decent track on the album. And it’s less Keith and more Mick, which should probably be made illegal.

19. Toots and the Maytals – Monkey Man

The bubbly Stella threatening to squirt up his throat and out of his nose as he contemplates how absolutely hilarious he is, BLUES NIGHT makes another sequencing joke while injecting a bit of life and musical familiarity into the last few tracks of his mixtape. And did I tell you how Keith was a big fan of Jamaican music? D’you want me to tell you again…?

20. Fred McDowell – You Got To Move 

“Why thank you, Missa Jagger. You been kind ‘nuff to admit you dint write dis song. I worked hard all my life and ain’t never had nuttin, but now you got my song on yo pop’lar rekkid album, I can ‘ford to live my last days in sum comfit.”

(Less than a year later)

“Lord, don’t be gittin’ ready on me yet. I ain’t even spent this here royalty check!”

21. The Rolling Stones – Still a Fool 

True, it sounds like Jagger is singing with a saucepan stuck on his head. But it’s the Rolling Stones playing a Muddy Waters blues, and that’s a good place for us to end. Drink up and go home.

 

SONGS from the MAN ROOM 

The original BLUES NIGHT CD. Still requested by shameless freeloaders worldwide...

 

1. Mitchell's Christian Singers - Traveling Shoes

2. Muddy Waters – I Can’t Be Satisfied

3. Markos Vamvakaris – Taxim-Zeybekiko

4. Michael Hurley – Wildgeeses

5. Lord Invader – Reincarnation

6. Jimi Hendrix – Hear My Train a-Coming

7. Jackie Mittoo – Got My Bugaloo

8. Blind Willie McTell – Atlanta Strut

9. Golden Gate Jubilee Singers – The Sun Didn’t Shine

10. John Lee Hooker – It Serve You Right to Suffer

11. Joseph Spence – Brownskin Gal

12. Songs Ohia – Soul

13. Josh White – The Lass with the Delicate Air

14. John Fahey – Wine and Roses

15. Elizabeth Cotton – Freight Train

16. Rita Abaci – Gazeli Neva Sabah

17. Bill Williams – Total Rag

18. Blue Sky Boys – Down on the Banks of the Ohio

19. Robert Wilkins – Rollin’ Stone (Part 2)

20. Sweet Honey in the Rock – Grey Goose

21. Fred and Annie Mae Mc Dowell – Get Right, Church

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HomeWhat we're playingRecord ShelfLiveContact/CompetitionLinks